Showing posts with label spaghetti. Show all posts
Showing posts with label spaghetti. Show all posts

Wednesday, March 19, 2014

Carbone Going Corporate


CARBONE
and
The Former ROCCO'S SIGN

Thompson Street
GREENWICH VILLAGE
NEW YORK


The juggernaut, as the New York Times recently called then, The Torris Boys (Major Foods) is going corporate. "Watch Out Boys and Girls," that means exclusiveness, cachet, and overall cool factor goes down. Major expansion, they going corporate, McDonaldesque if you will. Well not quite, but you know what I mean. The so called Torrisi Boys, Mario Carbone, Rich Torrisi, and partner Jeff Zalaznick who own and operate; Carbone, Parm (2 locations), Torrisi Italian Specialties, and ZZ plan on major expansion in the next couple of years with a large bakery/ restaurant downtown, that will partner with Melissa Weller and feature fresh baked; Bagels,Danish, Bear Claws, Challah Bread, yeast based and other baked goods. Jeff Zalaznick states, "It's going to be our version of Barney Greengrass."
     The partners whose Parm Restaurant on Mulberry Street next to their first place Torrisi Italian Specialties has been super successful from day one and quickly spawned a sister Parm at Yankee Stadium. The Torrisi Boys (Major Foods) plan on opening several more outposts of PARM all over New York, in; Battery Park, 2 in Brooklyn of which one be near to The Barclay's Center and another in Williamsburg, the Upper West Side and who knows where else? The New York Times says they plan on building Parm into a citywide Shake Shack style franchise. "Good Luck." Corporate, make a ton of money, but majorly lose cachet and so-called cool-factor. You can't have it all boys. They probably do.
    Most well-heeled New Yorkers hate chains a corporate conglomerates when it comes to restaurants. Many giant nation-wide food chains who've made it big in a large part of the country thought they'd come in to New York and knock-em-dead. Not! Discerning New Yorkers tend to like small independent restaurants, not corporate like Applebee's and Bennigans. When you see restaurants like Red Lobster and Olive Garden doing well around Times Square it's tourists and the less well healed New Yorkers going to them, the rest of us hate chain restaurants. 
    So it will remain to see what happens with Parm, Carbone and the now much smaller Major Foods (Torrisi Boys) empire. With a good number more Parm Outlets open, will the original loss it cachet and hot-factor? Who knows? Probably. And what of Carbone, the flagship of the corporation which has from day one and to this point (March 20, 2014) been uber-hot and still New York's Hottest Restaurant Ticket in Town? Time will tell, and ...


DBZ





PARM

Mulberry Street


Frank Sinatra & Dean Martin



FRANK & DEAN

NOW THAT'S COOL" !!!!











Friday, September 20, 2013

SUNDAY SAUCE "GRAVY"

SUNDAY SAUCE




aka
GRAVY


"When a meal centered around a Sunday Sauce is announced, one can have visions of Blissful Ecstasy at thoughts of eating Pasta laden with Italian Sausages, Savory Meatballs, Beef Braciola, and succulent Pork Ribs. All this has been slowly simmered to culinary perfection. Yes just the thoughts can enrapture one into a Delightful Frenzy of the Most Blissful Feelings of smelling, seeing, and consuming all the ingredients, the Sausages, Meatballs and Gravy. Yes a Sunday Sauce can and does have such effects on one’s mind, body,  and soul. And, I do not want to sound prejudice, but this is pure fact, it is the Male of the Italian-American species who Love The Sunday Sauce in all its form, far more than the  female sex.  True! Meatballs too! And Italian-American men and boys Love and hold  oh-so-dare, their Meatballs, Sunday Sauce, Sausage & Peppers,  and Meatball Parm Sandwiches.

  The  Sunday  Sauce that  my mother  would make was with Meatballs and Beef Braciole. My memories are vivid watching my mother stuffing the Braciole with  garlic, parsley, Pecorino Romano, and Pignoli Nuts,  then  tying the bundles with  butchers cord to hold  the Braciole together as they slowly simmered in the Gravy.  Another fond memory was helping my mother roll and shape the Meatballs."





This passage has been excerpted from Daniel Bellino-Zwicke's upcoming new book 
SUNDAY SAUCE, which will be available in Paperback and Kindle on Amazon.com or at a bookstore near you. Sunday Sauce is due for November 2013 release. In the meantime see Daniel's other books (La TAVOLA,  Clemenza's Meatball Sunday Sauce) on Sunday Sauce, Italian-American Food and The Italian-American Experience in New York and America ...



Sunday, January 27, 2013

RONZONI SONO BUONI







RONZONI

MEZZE RIGATONI



.
"Ronzoni Sono Buoni," if you are Italian and grew up in the New York area in the great decades of the 1960's and or 70s you know the slogan. We Italians do love our pasta, we're weened on it! Pasta is the main staple of our diet. Many are fanatical about and love it so, they insist on having it several times a week. I'm one. Pasta, can be covered in a wide variety of sauces,  in some soups like; Pasta Fagoli (Pasta Fazool), in Minestrone's, with Pasta and Peas, and Pasta con Ceci (Chick Peas). Yes, we are weened on it. Mommy gave me, my bothers and sister Pastina coated in a bit of butter and Parmigiano when we were just toddlers  and every so often I have to pick up a box of Ronzoni Pastina, as I love and crave it still, and of late as with many my age, you start craving things you loved as a child, thus my stints with PASTINA ."Ronzoni Sono Buoni," it means, Ronzoni is So Good, and that it is. This brand of  Pasta, born in New York City at the turn of the 20th Century has been a mainstay of not only Italian-Americans of the East Coast but, for all. For years before the surge of many a imported pasta product in the U.S., Ronzoni, was not the only game in town for Macaroni, there was the Prince and Creamette, as well, but Ronzoni dominated the market and though I don't have stats, I would wage to say that 85 to 90 % of all commercial pasta sold in the New York, New Jersey, and Philadelphia areas was Ronzoni, the pasta in the bright blue boxes, Ronzoni Sono Buoni. God I wonder how many plates and bowls of Spaghetti, Ziti and other Ronzoni pastas I ate over the years, starting with Pastina as a toddler  and moving to Spaghetti with Tomato Sauce or Meatballs, Baked Ziti, Stuffed Shells and more. Oh “Stuffed Shells,” they bring back memories of my mother who loved them. We had them often, along with Lasagna made with Ronzoni Lasagana. You don't see Stuffed Shells around that much any more, they used to be on many a restaurant and even more home menus. There popularity has waned, but every once and a while I'll pick up a box of Ronzoni large shells, just for the purpose of bringing back those memories of mom making them and me loving them as  a child. I'll make a batch of tomato sauce, cook the Ronzoni Shells, and stuff them with ricotta and Parmigiano, bake them in tomato sauce, and "Voila" Stuffed Shells of days gone by. I do the same with a Pastina as I still love the dish so, dressed with butter and fresh grated Parmigiano Reggiano, “makes me feel like a kid again!” Yum, delicious little pleasure you can whip up in minutes and bring back visions of your youth. All with some butter, Parmigiano and a box of Ronzoni Pastina. That's Ronzoni, every bit a part of my life and youth as a spring ol Slinky, Etch-A-Sketch, The Three Stooges, Saturday Morning Cartoons, and all the favorites of my youth, Ronzon Sono Buoni, “Ronzoni it's so good!”




Screen Shot 2015-09-20 at 11.24.43 AM




SPAGHETTI
.
.





Screen Shot 2015-06-21 at 12.01.36 PM


SEGRETO ITALIANO

SECRET ITALIAN RECIPES

SALSA SEGRETO

FAMOUS PASTA SAUCE

RECCIPE

Of GINO'S

NEW YORK








RONZONI MACARONI COMPANY


LONG ISLAND CITY, QUEENS NEW YORK

1918





RONZONI FACTS 

From an Article in the New York Times 1974

I'm sure these facts are no longer true, as many Americans now buy a lot more imported Italian pasta then they did back in 1974. In the 1950's, 60's 70's  and even into the 1980's  Ronzoni dominated the past market, not only in New York, but for the entire country. 


1  -   New York is the largest market for pasta in America, accounting for 20% of all pasta sales in
         America, comes from New York.

2  -   Ronzoni sells more than 40% of all pasta sold in New York.

3  -   Ronzoni's sales were more than $40 Million dollars in 1973.

Thursday, February 16, 2012

ITALIAN AMERICAN ... WHAT IS IT?


There has long been a debate, fights, and Mud-Slinging in regards to Italian and Italian-American
food served in restaurants in New York and the rest of the U.S.. Culinary Snobs, people who "Think" they know what they are talking about and what not. I can set the record straight, being an
 Italian-American who has been eating Italian and Italian-American food for more than forty years, who has been professional Chef and someone who has eaten all over Italy on some 15 trips to the great peninsular. In addition to studying Italian Food in Italy for some 25 years, I am constantly reading all sorts of articles , cookbooks, and historical facts on this subject, in addition to being one of the countries foremost authorities on Italian Wine.
   Anyway, let me tell you. I myself was once a uninformed Food Snob who badmouthed and was slightly disdainful of unauthentic Italian food being served in restaurants all over the city. That's just in restaurants. Of course I Loved eating Sunday Sauce, Eggplant Parmigiano, and Meatballs that my aunts made at our frequent family get together s. And on the occasions that we weren't at one of the family's homes but in an Italian restaurant in Lodi or Garfield, I usually ordered Chicken  or Veal Parmigiano. Yes I loved it, but these dishes, for me at the time (1985-1993) had their place, and it was not in the kitchen or on the plates of any serious Italian Restaurant in Manhattan.
   Eventually as I learned more of the history of food in New York, Italy, and the World, I realized that there was actually a real true Italian-American Cuisine and that it was completely valid.
  Do you realize that if you think there is not a true valid Italian-American Cuisine, then you also must concede that there is No True French Cuisine, because the origins of what we now know as French food and Cuisine is really Italian. Yes, I said Italian. For the food and cuisine of French was quite primitive and did not begin to form into what we now know as French Food and French Cuisine until Caterina Medici of the Noble Florentine Family of the Medici married the King of France and brought her Florentine Chefs with her to the French Court way back in the 15th Century. So there. Many dishes which most people think of as French in origin, like Duck ala Orange, Bechamel, and others, are really Italian. "So there!"
   Anyway, back to Italian-American food. Food and cuisines are constantly changing and evolving. This is how Florentine Chefs of Italy, went to France with the newly crowned French Queen who was of the Italian Peninsular in one Katherine Medici  and taught the French how to cook. Thus Italians immigrating to the United States in the early 20th Century brought their ingredients and techniques from mother Italy to cook the dishes from their homeland, with some modifications do to financial issues (being poor) and the unavailability of certain ingredients, and started forming what would one day be known as Italian-American  food (Cuisine).




"to be Continued"


Daniel Bellino Zwicke









FRANK SINATRA
ONE of THE GREATEST
ITALIAN AMERICAN'S of ALL

Monday, August 11, 2008

SUNDAY SAUCE ....... Daniel Bellino Zwicke




SUNDAY SAUCE
Meatballs

and the "Meatball Parm Sandwich" you make on
Monday after the Sunday you make the sauce.








SUNDAY SAUCE


One of the great traditions of the Italian American enclave in the U.S. is the ritual of Sunday afternoon when the entire family gets together for Mama’s or Nona’s famed “Sunday Sauce.” What is it? Well there are a number of variations on the theme. Most Sunday Sauce’s are made with Italian Sausage, Braciola, and Meatballs. Some people make theirs with pork ribs, beef neck, and possibly chicken thighs and backs. These meats are slowly simmered for several hours with tomato, minced onions, garlic, celery, and carrots. I generally like to make my Sunday Sauce with sausage, meatballs, and pork ribs. Other times I’ll make it with sausage, ribs, and braciola. An old tradition in some families is that mother or grandma would start the sauce early on a Sunday morning, get it simmering away for a couple hours on top of the stove, then put it in the oven for a couple hours while everyone goes to church, the sauce slowly simmers and when you get back home, the sauce is ready.
The Sunday Sauce that my mother would make was with sausage, meatballs and beef braciola. My memories are vivid watching my mother stuffing the braciola with garlic,
parsley, Pecorino, and pignoli nuts, then sewing up the bundles with a needle and thread so they would hold together while simmering in the gravy (many families all over the New York and around the country simply call Sunday Sauce “Gravy”). Another fond memory was helping my mother roll and shape the meatballs.
As for me, my Sunday Sauce will vary depending on my mood. One thing I love to do when making the sauce is the addition of pork spare ribs, which not to many people use, I love it.
Whenever people eat my sauce, they go nuts for the ribs and some are surprised cause they might never have had them in a sauce before. They didn’t know that you could use pork spareribs. The ribs are traditional with some but not everybody. It is quite a shame for those who don’t add the ribs because they give the sauce some wonderful flavor and they are incredibly delicious to eat after braising in the sauce for a couple of hours. Whenever I make the sauce and I’m dishing it out to friends and family, I always make sure that I have my fare share of the ribs. Pork ribs cooked in this manner, simmering in the sauce are oh so succulent and tasty. They are far beyond compare. “They are Out-of-this-World!!!” The friends, one-by-one, go nuts for them. “Yes they are most than tasty!”
And what to serve with the Sunday Sauce you ask? It should be a short macaroni; rigatoni, ziti, or gnocchi are best.
The rituals of cooking, serving, and eating Sunday Sauce is a time honored one. It is a beautiful thing. If you mention the term Sunday Sauce to any number of millions of Italian-Americans, the wheels start turning in their heads. Thoughts of how tasty it is, all the different components; the meatballs, sausages, braciola, (maybe ribs, beef or pork neck), the pasta, and the gravy itself.
They think about sitting at the table with friends and or family, people they love. They think about the antipasti that will start the meal and about some good Italian Wine, maybe a nice Chianti. They think about the warmth in the air, loved ones, Dino, Sinatra, and of course, the
Sunday Sauce itself. “It’s a beautiful thing!!!” If you’ve never done it, “Try it!” If you haven’t cooked one for some time, plan a get-together soon. “Sunday Sauce, it brings people together,” in a most delightful way.


Tuesday, July 1, 2008

Donata Venturini Hosts LAMBRUSCO DINNER at DeL POSTO



MARIO BATALI slurps SPAGHETTI with Joe Bastianich as Mom Lidia looks on at Del Posto in Chelsea

Leonardo Locasio of Winebow with Marelisa Allegrini (Great AMARONE producer) with Sommelier DANIEL BELLINO ZWICKE at Wine Tasting downtown New York



Butcher at ALBANESE MEAT MARKET(Italian Butcher)











DONATA VENTURINI HOSTED WINE DINNER at DEL POSTO


Monday June 30, 2008. Donata Venturini of the Emilia Romagnan wine estate Baldini Venturini hosted a Lambrusco/ Emilia Romagnan wine dinner at Del Posto in the Meatpacking District of New York last night. The dinner was attended by members of the Wine Press, including Natasha Lardera, Pino Cavallo of Gazettino, Italian Wine Industry people like Leonardo Locasio the founder and proprietor of Winebow, Salvatore Evangelista of Supreme Wines, and Daniel Bellino Zwicke.

The feature of the evening was the wines of Baldini Venturini which were paired along with other wines to a phenomenal 7 course menu created by Del Posto’s Executive Chef Mark Ladner.

The evening started with a cocktail hour of Carpene Malvoltti Prosecco followed by the sit down dinner.

We began the meal with perfect Prosciutto di Parma paired with Venturini’s Malvasia,
Colli di Scandiano e di Canossa 2007. This wine was absolutely extraordinary. Immediately as I brought the wine to my nose I could smell a complex array of aromas led by what smelled like Over-Ripe Pears and Apples. It was phenomenal. In the mouth the wine tasted of a great Sauterne minus the sweetness. This wine is a absolute “Winner,” Unfortunately these wines are not yet available in the U.S. but is sure to be so soon as a few of the Wine Importers present were hot for these wines and practically fighting to see who will be Lucky enough to have them in their Portfolio.

The second course was Aragosta con Salsa Americana (Lobster Salad with Campari Sauce) paired with the Tocai Friuliano,Livio Feluga 2007 which paired nicely with the Lobster. The Tocai exhibited classic Tocai flavors of crisp Apple with hints of Figs and nuts. Very nice from one of Friuli’s top producers Livio Feluga, who in this Wine Guys eyes (nose and mouth) makes the most wonderful Pinot Grigio on the entire market.

Livio Feluga’s Pinot Grigio has a beautiful copper tint in color, with excellent fruit aromas, and wonderful Pear and Kiwi with a tad of savory ness that is absolutely delicious. This wine taste of ripe Pears and Kiwi with a twinge of savory-ness.
Feluga’s Pinot Grigio is perfection when it comes to representing this grape variety to it ultimate peak. I am not one to hardly ever drink Pinot Grigio, but I would never say “No” to the fine wine. It is a joy to drink.
Note: We did not drink Livio Feluga Pinot Grigio at the dinner, but with the mention of the Tocai that we had, I couldn’t pass up the chance to talk about this wonderful wine.

For our “Third Course” Chef Ladner sent us Gargenelli Al Ragu Bognese, which was absolute “Perfection Personified” on a plate. The Bolognese was so wonderful that this guy wish that the portion on the plate was double of what it actually was. Rich and so sublime. It was cruel and a tease to us to eat something so flavorsome, and just have a tiny taste. “Se la Vie.” Lambrusco Rosso, Reggiano, Venturini Baldini 2007 with its invigorating flavors of Sour Cherries and Plum was the perfect foil to the “
Perfect Bolognese.” The wine was refreshing and wonderful and a delight to drink.

Our fourth course, Salsiccia di Foe Gras was quite tasty. The Lambrusco Spumante, Rubino del Cerro, Venturini Baldini 2007 paired with the Foe Gras sausage was an excellent match.

Fifth Course was Beef Tenderloin that melted in the mouth, grass fed from Colorado. Superb, paired with Barolo Damilano.

For desert we were served two courses. The first Dolce was Citus Fantasia (Lime and Grapefruit Gelato) paired with two tasty desert wines; a delisious Marzemino, Colli di Scandiano e di Canossa, Venturini Baldini 2007 and Malvasia, Colli di Scandiano e di Canossa, Venturini Baldini 2007 which was delicate and elegant with lovely Pear and Apple flavors.

We were then served the second desert course of Biscotti Assortiti (Assorted Cookies), paired with 10 Year Tawny Port, Neiport NV.

The dinner, the food, wine, and company were a “Joy.” It was quite a wonderful evening.

Let us point out the fact that in the 1970 their was a “Tons” of awful cheap and cheese Lambrusco dumped on the U.S. which is not real Lambrusco but wine that was created to sell to those with uneducated and unsophisticated palates. There were two or three companies who ahd excellent ad and markdting campaigns geared toward that specific audience. The wine was compared to other awful cheap wines like Boone’s Farm. These people who made these so-called Lambrusco’s did a great job of marketing and selling Millions upon Million’s of bottles of the “Plunk.” They also did a great job of giving real true Lambrusco a Super Big Black Eye and oh-so bad reputation of which was never deserved , just as massed produced Soave and Valpolicella received an undeserved bad naneat the time.

True Lambrusco wonderful to drink. It is a nice refreshing unique alternative to drink now and then as something different. Luckily the Lambrusco Consorzio has done a fine job in recent years to kill this negative outlook of Lambrusco. The producers have done a great job making tasty true and traditional Lambrusco and New Yorkers and other Americans of good-taste and education have been taking to this Lovely wine. “Thank God, Lambrusco is finally getting the good due it deserves,” so has Valpolicella and Soave. These wines are good and pleasant to drink and it is nice to see more Americans discovering and accepting them. Even Loving them. Last year, more Lambrusco was sold then ever in the U.S. Have you tried some yet? Do so.