Showing posts with label meatballs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label meatballs. Show all posts

Saturday, October 12, 2013

SUNDAY SAUCE To INCLUDE SECRET SAUCE RECIPE

SUNDAY SAUCE For NOVEMBER 2013 RELEASE





WILL INCLUDE
 GINO'S SECRET SAUCE RECIPE










New York based Italian cookbook author Daniel Bellino Zwicke is set for a late November 2013 release of his latest book "Sunday Sauce" by Broadway Fifth Press ... Said to be include in the book are wonderful stories of Italian-American life; the people, the Food, the Kitchen, and rituals of the table. Featured recipes are of the famed Italian-AMerican Sunday meal, The Sunday Sauce, aka "Gravy," of which Daniel has include several recipe, including; Clemenza's Mob War Sunday Sauce "Gravy," DiMaggio Family Sunday Sauce Gravy, Sinatra Family Spaghetti & Meatballs, and the cherished Old School New York Italian Red-Sauce Restaurant "Gino's" of Lexington Ave.  (across from Blooming-dales, now closed after 65 years). Daniel will include a recipe for Gino's famed Salsa Segreta, "Secret Sauce" along with a multitude of Italian-American favorites. The book is quite wonderful, containing the best of Italian-America in recipes and colorful stories. We can't wait.

Tuesday, October 8, 2013

CARBONE OPEN For LUNCH

Breaking News






New York's Hottest Restaurant of 2013, "Carbone" is now open for Lunch .. Carbone, which has been serving dinner 7 nights a week since its opening in March, will now be open for lunch Monday - Friday along with Dinner 7 nights a week.

Friday, August 23, 2013

CLEMENZA'S MEATBALL SUNDAY SAUCE




Clemenza's Meatball Sunday Sauce
by Daniel B. Bellino
Is
NOW AVAILABLE on AMAZON.com KINDLE



Clemenza's Meatball Sunday Sauce. Wow, How is That for a Mouthful. A long awaited book and recipes of Godfather Caporegime Peter Clemenza is almost Here. Cookbook author Daniel B. Bellino (aka daniel Bellino-Zwicke) is about to release has latest, "Clemenza's Meatball Sunday Sauce, filled with wonderful stories of Italian and Italian-American Food, movies, Mobsters and more. Yes, the long awaited recipe of Fat Clemenza's Godfther Mob War Sunday Sauce, "Some Call it Gravy."
Daniel doesn't let us down with this one, as usual with his signature style on the history and current events of Italian-American New Yorkers, their Food, the people, their habits, and wonderful rituals of the Italian-American Table and Kitchen. It's all here, including; great recipes for 3 wonderful Sunday Sauce Gravys, Meatballs, Pasta Fazool, Goodfellas Veal & Peppers, Mussels Marinara, and even the never before publish Gino's Secret Sauce (Salsa Segreta)
And as a Celebration of Mr. Bellino's latest book, it will be released for a limited time only and to the first 5,000 people to gab it, at the insane bargain price of just .99 Cents on Amazon and only on Amazon Kindle ... They say the Secret Sauce Recipe alone should be selling for $100 a pop, but Daniel, as a gift of gratitude to those who have been supporting him, and to get the word out to new friends is offering "Clemenza's Meatball Sunday Sauce," for less than a Buck. "We love it and think that's great." So check it out, it's quite the wonderful read.






Article by Anthony Roma











Thursday, May 2, 2013

SUNDAY GRAVY PASTA SAUCE WORLDS MOST EXPENSIVE





SUNDAY GRAVY
$35.00 A JAR
The  WORLD'S MOST EXPENSIVE
ITALIAN JARED PASTA SAUCE


Mamma mia! That’s a lot of money to mangia.
At $35 a jar, Sunday Gravy is the most expensive pasta sauce in town — and the price tag is giving some people agita. “You’re kidding me, right?!” belched one Facebook poster. “Who in their right mind would pay $35 for sauce?”
The ruby-red delicacy costs far more than celebrity blends made by Mario Batali ($7.80), Lidia Bastianich ($6.80) or Rao’s ($8).
And it’s more than double the $16 for a plate of pasta with meat sauce at Eataly’s La Pasta or even a $22 penne with veal and pork ragu at Il Buco.




IF YOU THINK THIS IS An ABSURD PRICE and WANT TO MAKE YOUR OWN TASTY ITALIAN SUNDAY SAUCE GRAVY alla CLEMENZA alla FRANK SINATRA
GET YOURSELF A COPY of DANIEL BELLINO-ZWICKE'S AWESOME BOOK
"La TAVOLA" ITALIAN-AMERICAN NEW YORKERS ADVENTURES of THE TABLE
With MANY GREAT RECIPES INCLUDING SUNDAY SAUCE alla CLEMENZA, THE WAY FRANK SINATRA LIKED IT ... MANGIA!!!

IF YOU MAKE THE SUNDAY SAUCE GRAVY RECIPE in "La TAVOLA" IT WILL COST YOU ABOUT $35 to $40 to MAKE a LARGE BATCH THAT WILL FEED ABOUT 20 PEOPLE or MAKE 20 SERVINGS of SAUCE WITH PASTA and SOME MEATBALL PARM SANDWICHES ... YOU'D HAVE to BUY 5 JARS of SUNDAY GRAVY The WORLD'S MOST EXPENSIVE JARRED PASTA SAUCE, COSTING YOU ABOUT $175 .. If you MAKE YOUR OWN SAUCE YOU WILL SAVE ABOUT $130.00, YOUR SAUCE WILL BE BETTER, IT'S MORE FUN and YOU CAN GET A GREAT NEW ITALIAN FOOD BOOK (La Tavola) To BOOT .. BASTA!



Sunday, April 28, 2013

BEST MEATBALLS IN TOWN "NEW YORK TOWN"






The big question? Where to get the Best Meatballs in town, the town of New York City? I can easily answer that, and "It's Not The Meatball Shop" which no self-respecting Italian would be caught dead in. Not more than once anyway. Once to check it out. It's OK, but it's a rip-off and if you're looking for any kind of Italian feel, as the Big Boys would say "Fugg-etta-bout It!!!" The Meatball Shop is for non-Italians, those not fortunate to have a mother, Nonna, and Aunts that make Meatballs that would blows those of The Meatball Shop right out of the water. My Nonna, Aunt Fran, Aunt Helen, "the Best Meatballs you could ever wish to Imagine." But poor you if you're not Italian and you have to go to such a poor substitute as The Meatball Shop. If you really want great meatballs, The Best In New York as-a-matter-of-fact, go to where the late Great Frank Sinatra went, and head over to West 56th Street to Patsy's ... It was Frank Sinatra's all-time favorite. He ate there many times over the years. Patsy's is wonderful, with; great ambiance, real Italian American Food, The Best Meatballs in Town, and the spirit of one Francis Albert Sinatra, "Frank."






READ ABOUT 
ITALIAN-AMERICAN NEW YORK
FRANK SINATRA
adn HIS
FAVORITE FOOD
In 
Daniel Bellin-Zwicke's
"La TAVOLA"
Available on Amazon





"Yes PATSY'S Was My
All-Time FAVORITE Restaurant.
And if You Want to Make The Kind of Italian Food
That I Liked, Check Out La TAVOLA by One of My
Greatest Fans Daniel Bellino-Zwicke. Basta!"


Wednesday, February 2, 2011

ITALIAN AMERICAN

WHAT is Italian ... ITALIAN-AMERICAN




    There has long been a debate, fights, and Mud-Slinging in regards to Italian and Italian-American
food served in restaurants in New York and the rest of the U.S.. Culinary Snobs, people who "Think" they know what they are talking about and what not. I can set the record straight, being an
 Italian-American who has been eating Italian and Italian-American food for more than forty years, who has been professional Chef and someone who has eaten all over Italy on some 15 trips to the great peninsular. In addition to studying Italian Food in Italy for some 25 years, I am constantly reading all sorts of articles , cookbooks, and historical facts on this subject, in addition to being one of the countries foremost authorities on Italian Wine.
   Anyway, let me tell you. I myself was once a uninformed Food Snob who badmouthed and was slightly disdainful of unauthentic Italian food being served in restaurants all over the city. That's just in restaurants. Of course I Loved eating Sunday Sauce, Eggplant Parmigiano, and Meatballs that my aunts made at our frequent family get together s. And on the occasions that we weren't at one of the family's homes but in an Italian restaurant in Lodi or Garfield, I usually ordered Chicken  or Veal Parmigiano. Yes I loved it, but these dishes, for me at the time (1985-1993) had their place, and it was not in the kitchen or on the plates of any serious Italian Restaurant in Manhattan.
   Eventually as I learned more of the history of food in New York, Italy, and the World, I realized that there was actually a real true Italian-American Cuisine and that it was completely valid.
  Do you realize that if you think there is not a true valid Italian-American Cuisine, then you also must concede that there is No True French Cuisine, because the origins of what we now know as French food and Cuisine is really Italian. Yes, I said Italian. For the food and cuisine of French was quite primitive and did not begin to form into what we now know as French Food and French Cuisine until Caterina Medici of the Noble Florentine Family of the Medici married the King of France and brought her Florentine Chefs with her to the French Court way back in the 15th Century. So there. Many dishes which most people think of as French in origin, like Duck ala Orange, Bechamel, and others, are really Italian. "So there!"
   Anyway, back to Italian-American food. Food and cuisines are constantly changing and evolving. This is how Florentine Chefs of Italy, went to France with the newly crowned French Queen who was of the Italian Peninsular in one Katherine Medici  and taught the French how to cook. Thus Italians immigrating to the United States in the early 20th Century brought their ingredients and techniques from mother Italy to cook the dishes from their homeland, with some modifications do to financial issues (being poor) and the unavailability of certain ingredients, and started forming what would one day be known as Italian-American  food (Cuisine).


"to be Continued"


by Daniel Bellino Zwicke

Tuesday, August 26, 2008

TRIPPA, TRUFFLES & SAUVIGNON





"GREATEST SUMMER TRUFFLES EVER!!!""""

We had another great plate of "Taglierlini with Truffle" the other day at Bar Pitti.
The Black Summer Truffles from Umbria have been so good this year, that they taste almost as good as the "White Alba Truffles" of the Autum and Winter Season.
It was quite funny when my friend Pat "P" and I took owe first bites, i said, "Patty Boy," these Truffles are as good as the "Whites." He agreed, and the words were barely out our mouths when Govanni came over and aske us how our Pasta was and added that they were "Stupenious" this year. "Just as good as the White Truffles." We told him that we just said the same thing, and at about a fourth of the price at $23.00 a plate, they were an absolute "Bargain."

We had a plate of Vitello Tonnato and "Trippa Fiorentina." both were tasty as ever.
If you haven't had any of the Norcia Summer Truffle, run on down to "Bar Pitti" and get a plate. "they're Amazing!!!!" We drank a bottle of "Macari Sauvignon Blanc,"
as everyone seems to be doing these days and we were as "Happy as Peas in a Pod."

by Daniel Bellino Zwicke

Watch for Daniel Bellino Zwicke's upcoming book, "La Tavola" to be released November 2008 by Aardvark Global Publishing and read about the Adventures of the Table of
Italian-American New Yorkers.

Monday, August 11, 2008

SUNDAY SAUCE ....... Daniel Bellino Zwicke




SUNDAY SAUCE
Meatballs

and the "Meatball Parm Sandwich" you make on
Monday after the Sunday you make the sauce.








SUNDAY SAUCE


One of the great traditions of the Italian American enclave in the U.S. is the ritual of Sunday afternoon when the entire family gets together for Mama’s or Nona’s famed “Sunday Sauce.” What is it? Well there are a number of variations on the theme. Most Sunday Sauce’s are made with Italian Sausage, Braciola, and Meatballs. Some people make theirs with pork ribs, beef neck, and possibly chicken thighs and backs. These meats are slowly simmered for several hours with tomato, minced onions, garlic, celery, and carrots. I generally like to make my Sunday Sauce with sausage, meatballs, and pork ribs. Other times I’ll make it with sausage, ribs, and braciola. An old tradition in some families is that mother or grandma would start the sauce early on a Sunday morning, get it simmering away for a couple hours on top of the stove, then put it in the oven for a couple hours while everyone goes to church, the sauce slowly simmers and when you get back home, the sauce is ready.
The Sunday Sauce that my mother would make was with sausage, meatballs and beef braciola. My memories are vivid watching my mother stuffing the braciola with garlic,
parsley, Pecorino, and pignoli nuts, then sewing up the bundles with a needle and thread so they would hold together while simmering in the gravy (many families all over the New York and around the country simply call Sunday Sauce “Gravy”). Another fond memory was helping my mother roll and shape the meatballs.
As for me, my Sunday Sauce will vary depending on my mood. One thing I love to do when making the sauce is the addition of pork spare ribs, which not to many people use, I love it.
Whenever people eat my sauce, they go nuts for the ribs and some are surprised cause they might never have had them in a sauce before. They didn’t know that you could use pork spareribs. The ribs are traditional with some but not everybody. It is quite a shame for those who don’t add the ribs because they give the sauce some wonderful flavor and they are incredibly delicious to eat after braising in the sauce for a couple of hours. Whenever I make the sauce and I’m dishing it out to friends and family, I always make sure that I have my fare share of the ribs. Pork ribs cooked in this manner, simmering in the sauce are oh so succulent and tasty. They are far beyond compare. “They are Out-of-this-World!!!” The friends, one-by-one, go nuts for them. “Yes they are most than tasty!”
And what to serve with the Sunday Sauce you ask? It should be a short macaroni; rigatoni, ziti, or gnocchi are best.
The rituals of cooking, serving, and eating Sunday Sauce is a time honored one. It is a beautiful thing. If you mention the term Sunday Sauce to any number of millions of Italian-Americans, the wheels start turning in their heads. Thoughts of how tasty it is, all the different components; the meatballs, sausages, braciola, (maybe ribs, beef or pork neck), the pasta, and the gravy itself.
They think about sitting at the table with friends and or family, people they love. They think about the antipasti that will start the meal and about some good Italian Wine, maybe a nice Chianti. They think about the warmth in the air, loved ones, Dino, Sinatra, and of course, the
Sunday Sauce itself. “It’s a beautiful thing!!!” If you’ve never done it, “Try it!” If you haven’t cooked one for some time, plan a get-together soon. “Sunday Sauce, it brings people together,” in a most delightful way.